Don’t you just love the December holidays? 

Despite the craziness of the holiday rush – the December holidays will always hold a special place in a lot of people’s hearts. And have you ever noticed how each culture in the world has its own way of celebrating the last few days of the year? Some celebrate Christmas, others Hannukah, Kwanzaa, or Boxing day. In Mexico, they celebrate Las Posadas – which directly translates to “The Inns”. It is in reference to the grueling search for lodging that Joseph and Mary went through before giving birth to Jesus Christ in Bethlehem – or also known as The Christmas Story. 

For today’s blog – and as preparation for The Mexico Trip – we are giving you a crash course on Posadas and how it is celebrated in Mexico. We’ve always mentioned how Mexican culture is big on family and relationships, even when doing business. Posadas is one of those holidays that center around those values. Familiarizing yourself with Posadas is a step you can take toward your business’s globalization and growth.

Below are some details, symbolisms, and popular activities during this festive time of the year:

Posadas festivities are celebrated for 9 nights – starting every December 16th through December 24th.

Piñata – a Mexican party won’t be complete without the iconic stuffed party attraction. Piñatas are commonly filled with candy, sometimes small fruits, cookies, or peanuts.

Aguinaldo – this is the annual Christmas bonus that businesses are required by law to pay their employees. Aguinaldo is usually given on or before Dec 20th.

Ponche Navideño – Mexican Christmas fruit punch – traditionally prepared using tejocote (Mexican hawthorn), sugarcane, tamarind, pear, apple, guava, and cinnamon sticks. Some add tequila or rum and Ponche is usually served warm to complement the cool December breeze.

Tamales – warm treats made of steamed corn dough filled with meats, cheeses, and vegetables. Tamales are all over Mexico all year round but are especially popular during Posadas.

Litany – Mexican’s unique version of Christmas caroling. The Posada litany tells the Christmas story in song.

If you’ve already partnered with a supplier from Mexico or you plan to find some in this upcoming Mexico Trip – it wouldn’t hurt to get a head start on studying Mexican culture. It’s a nice touch if you can celebrate their traditions with them  – this shows exemplary business ethics from your end. And remember when we discussed Mexico’s tendency of establishing personal relationships with business partners? Las Posadas is a great entryway that will get your feet wet in building fruitful relationships that will help grow your business.

Happy holidays to all. See you at Monterrey in February!